Compensation FAQs

Workers who suffer injuries on the job normally have many questions running through their mind. Here we have provided many answers to the questions we are commonly asked about compensation information. We have also provided many questions and answers regarding medical treatment and general questions.

When will I get paid? How much will I be paid?

Filing a claim doesn’t guarantee payment of compensation or benefits. Your claim may be denied or disputed by the BWC or your employer. The Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation has 28 days from claim filing to accept or deny a claim. Learn about your options if your claim has been denied. Compensation won’t be paid until a claim is allowed.

The amount you are paid depends in part on how long you are unable to work. The Ohio BWC or a self-insured employer will calculate your earnings prior to your injury, and you will be paid a percentage of those wages. The wage calculation and rate of payment often change, depending upon how long you are unable to work. Wages may be set too low, and in these cases we can request an adjustment to consider special circumstances, periods of unemployment, or additional wage information, including wages from a second job.

How long will I be paid for the work I miss?

Generally, you would be entitled to be compensated until you are released to return to your former job, actually return to that job, or are determined to have reached maximum medical improvement (MMI).

How is the amount of money I am paid determined?

Your benefits are based on the amount of money you earned working for the year prior to the date of injury. In general, your Full Weekly Wage (FWW) is determined by the greater of your gross wages (including overtime) earned over the 6 weeks prior to the date of injury, divided by 6; or your gross wages (excluding overtime) for the 7 days before the injury. The first 12 weeks of temporary total disability (TTD) compensation will be paid at 72% of your FWW. Benefits after the first 12 weeks of TTD will be paid based on your Average Weekly Wage (AWW), which is generally calculated by taking your earnings from all employers for the year prior to the injury and dividing that amount by 52 weeks. Those benefits are paid at 66⅔% of your AWW.

Can I ask for a settlement?

This is an issue you should consult an attorney about. There may be factors you are not aware of, and an experienced attorney can help secure the maximum settlement amount. At a minimum, you should wait until you are sure you will have no further complications from your work injury. Most employers will not settle with an employee while they are still working there, as the risk of reinjury is present.

What happens if I go back to work after being deemed permanently and totally disabled?

You will lose any permanent total disability (PTD) benefits, and would likely be charged with fraud if you collect PTD compensation while working. If you believe you have medically recovered to the point of being able to return to work, consult an attorney about options before you do.

Do I still get any benefits when I return to work?

There are other types of benefits that may be available after returning to work. For instance, you may be entitled to a Working Wage Loss if your injury prevents you from making the same amount of salary as you did prior to the injury. This is something you should consult with an attorney about.

Is any tax taken out of my benefits check?

No. Workers' compensation benefits are tax-free.

Why do my Worker's Comp checks come in for different amounts?

The first 12 weeks of TTD compensation are paid at 72% of your FWW. After the first 12 weeks, it is paid at 66⅔% of your AWW. It is possible that because of the day of the week a check is originally issued, or other factors, that a check may only cover a portion of the standard 2-week pay period. The period covered will be listed on the payment. Rest assured, you will receive the full amount you are entitled to, and eventually, the checks will be for a consistent amount and released on a consistent basis.

How long does it take for me to receive my benefits check?

Unfortunately, there is no definitive answer to this question. It may take many weeks (and sometimes, months) before compensation is received after it is awarded.