Medical Treatment FAQs

Woman receiving medical treatment for work injury

It only takes a split second for an accident at work to turn a person’s life upside-down as the medical bills start to roll in. We've aimed to answer all of your questions regarding receiving the medical treatment you need. If you still have unanswered questions about workers' compensation or receiving medical treatment, please contact our office at (614) 334-4649. We've also answered many FAQs regarding general claim info and receiving compensation.

Who approves treatment?

Requests for treatment are submitted by your doctor to the MCO assigned to your case. If your employer is self-insured, requests are sent to your employer’s TPA (third-party administrator). The MCO or TPA may request additional information from your doctor or a medical review before approving the treatment. Denials of treatment may be appealed.

Can I go to my family doctor?

An injured worker has the right to be treated by a doctor of his choice, as long as the doctor is a BWC-certified healthcare provider. Many times, family doctors do not treat job-related injuries because they are concerned about the paperwork involved and/or the hassles associated with claims procedures. Your family doctor may be able to refer you to a BWC-certified provider. You can also ask for recommendations from co-workers, your union representative, your attorney, or other people who have received treatment for a work injury. The BWC and your MCO maintain lists of physicians who treat industrial injuries, as well.

I want to change doctors. How?

You may decide to change physicians for a variety of reasons, ranging from the retirement of the provider, travel distance, or a desire for a different treatment option. Injured workers who wants to change physicians should notify the MCO and submit BWC Form C23. If your employer is self-insured, this form should be sent directly to the employer or its TPA.

I can’t get my prescriptions filled. What should I do?

Your pharmacist can explain why payment for a prescription is denied. It may be a coding error or a concern that the medication is inappropriate. Your doctor can provide additional information, if necessary, regarding the need for and the propriety of the medication. If the bill was denied pending the allowance of the claim, you will be reimbursed once your claim is allowed. Make sure to keep all receipts for medications and treatment related to your injury in case you need to request reimbursement.

What is MMI?

Temporary total disability (TTD) compensation is payable following an on-the-job injury until such time as the injured worker is released to return to her former job, actually returns to that job, or is determined to have reached maximum medical improvement (MMI). MMI indicates that the injury has reached a treatment plateau under the current treatment regimen. In other words, the condition has gotten about as good as it’s going to get! Although temporary benefits are no longer payable if the condition is no longer improving, other forms of compensation may be available for injured workers whose TTD has been terminated after a finding that their condition has reached MMI.

Why do I have to wait for treatment? I just want to get back to work!

During the initial processing period (i.e., when the Ohio BWC or your employer is deciding whether to allow or contest the claim), physicians may be reluctant to provide treatment, as there is no guarantee they will be paid. Some doctors will provide treatment, pending the allowance of the claim, with the expectation that the claim will be allowed or that you have other means of paying (for example, other insurance) should the claim be disallowed. While your claim is considered, avoid large unpaid medical bills that you may be responsible for paying should your claim be disallowed. Once the claim is allowed, providers (other than pharmacies) who have treated you for the job-related injury should submit their bills to your MCO.

What is an Independent Medical Examination (IME)?

An independent medical examination (IME) is a medical evaluation scheduled by the BWC or employer's representative to determine various medical issues related to your claim, including, but not limited to, whether treatment or testing is necessary, the degree of your permanent impairment, if any, and whether you have reached MMI.

How will I know if a doctor is certified by BWC?

The simplest way is to ask your doctor when you make the initial appointment. You may also call the employer's MCO, the BWC at 1-800-644-6292, or research BWC certified providers (by name, location and/or specialty) at the BWC's website.

How do I get my medical bills paid for?

In general, medical bills should be payable in an allowed claim. You should give your claim number to all of your medical providers who treat you in your claim. They will then request authorization for the medical treatment they request from the MCO.

What should I do if I start getting medical bills?

You should forward the bills to your MCO or self-insured employer. Bills that are not paid can be appealed to the BWC for further investigation.

Can I get reimbursed for prescriptions?

Like medical bills, in general, prescriptions for allowed conditions in your claim should be payable in an allowed claim. Inform your pharmacist that the prescription is for a workers' compensation claim.  You may need to pay for the initial prescription, but if the BWC determines the medicine was for the allowed conditions, you will be reimbursed.

Obviously, you are responsible for any bill or prescription that the BWC determines is not related to your claim.