Can I see my own doctor for a work-related injury?

patient with doctor

When you're injured in a fork-lift accident at your warehouse job or think you may have developed carpal-tunnel syndrome at your office job, your first move may be to go to the nearest emergency room or your doctor for diagnosis and treatment.

Fortunately, the Ohio workers’ compensation program allows this—but only for that initial visit.

After that, you must see a Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC)-certified physician for your treatment to be covered by workers’ comp. If you work for a self-insured employer such as UPS or Ohio State, your employer will decide regarding your eligibility and who you can see for treatment.

Finding a Certified Doctor

It's possible that your doctor is already BWC-certified—in which case, you won’t have to look further for a doctor to treat your work injury. However, if she's not and you continue to see her, you'll be responsible for all medical costs related to your work injury.

While your employer may suggest a doctor, you're under no obligation to visit that doctor. Instead, you can find a certified physician in your area by checking the provider look-up tool on the BWC’s website. As long as you receive workers’ comp benefits for the injury for which you're seeking treatment, medical costs related to your claim will be covered.

However, even for BWC-certified doctors, treatment has to be approved by your employer’s managed care organization (MCO) with employers who obtain workers' compensation through Ohio's state insurance fund or by your self-insured employer.

Getting Approval From Your MCO

If you're not already familiar with managed care organizations, understand how they work.

All employers who purchase workers’ comp insurance through a state fund must choose one of 13 MCOs recognized by the BWC to manage their workers’ compensation claims. The MCO oversees claim filing, and supervises medical treatment and employer return-to-work programs. Your employer’s MCO manages the medical portion of the claim, so additional medical procedures, treatments, and referrals from the treating physician have to be approved by the MCO.

If medications are prescribed, you have to inform the pharmacist that it's a workers’ comp claim and provide your BWC claim number. Any treatment or services you received before your workers’ comp claim is approved should be reimbursed after that approval. Note that some large Ohio employers are self-insured—this means they administer workers’ compensation claims directly, and your employer may manage the medical portion of your application.

Having Trouble? Call an Experienced Workers’ Comp Attorney

If you're like most of our clients, you may feel frustrated and hopeless when coverage for a needed medical procedure or prescription is denied. However, you may appeal any medical decisions made by your MCO, and you may work with an experienced workers’ comp attorney on your appeal.

If you feel like the BWC is saying you and your doctors are wrong, or even fraudulent, call me for a free review of your claim. I help many workers just like you overcome the challenges of the Ohio workers’ comp system, and I may assist you, too. We're never too busy to take your call or answer questions. Fill out the form on this page to connect with me today.

 

James Monast
Fighting for Ohio’s Injured Workers and their Families